Photography and Fetish

The essay Photography and Fetish by Christian Meet has stuck with me since I first encountered it earlier this semester. In this essay, Meet lays out his interpretation between film and photography. Meet describes both forms of production as taking. When looking at the definitions of take, I found one that fits into Meet philosophy: “To get Into one’s hands, Possessions, control, etc. , by force or artifice”. The concept of taking Is something that I have embraced In my exploration of photography, but It has recently caused certain dilemmas.

To take a photograph, according to Meet Is Like the killing of the “real” subject and compares photography with death. On page 140, Meet states, “even when the person photographed Is still living, that moment she or he was has vanished forever”. Photography’s ability to transport the subject onto film or Into digital format allows exclusive access to the photographer alone. Meet also uses the “snapshot” In relationship to death as an “Instantaneous abduction of the object out of the world into another kind of time”unlike cinema which replaces the object, after the act of appropriation in an unfolding of time, similar to that of life”.

Meet is critical of how a photograph creates an alternative dimensionality to the subject, forcing the subject to be viewed as “real” even though the temporal flow of the subject has been terminated. In regards to cinema, Meet creates the connection to life through film’s replacement of the subject. The moments taken serve as a stand in for the subject, and allows for a less aggressive rendering of the experience. Because of the subjects/concepts I am visually creating, photography seems too lenient of a medium to use.

My subject matter deals with experiences, which are not two-dimensional but involve all the senses, tactile, auditory and visual, even olfactory. With a print, these phenomenological experiences are not received in the manner that I want the viewer to be enveloped with. With the imagery I am creating, I must be extremely cautious to not Orientation or exotic the subjects, albeit people, places and objects, due to historical consequences of trying to photograph The Other and the spectacle that follows.

Film on the other hand, I feel as if I have the most control ever the interpretation/access to the viewers psychology and bodily reactions than a photograph. Film has allowed me access to moments that I could have not recorded with a click of the shutter. Even when viewing a piece of footage, I have often encountered moments that I was not aware of even being apart of the experience. Film has allowed me a more poetic rendering of the world, which accurately conveys the Interests and subjects that I create visually. Photography and Fetish By gobs get into one’s hands, Possessions, control, etc. By force or artifice”. The concept of taking is something that I have embraced in my exploration of photography, but it has recently caused certain dilemmas. To take a photograph, according to Meet is like Meet states, “even when the person photographed is still living, that moment she or he was has vanished forever”. Photography’s ability to transport the subject onto film or into digital format allows exclusive access to the photographer alone. Meet also uses the “snapshot” in relationship to death as an “instantaneous abduction of the the interests and subjects that I create visually.