Marigolds Essay

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Marigolds

Aimer can girl, doesn’t know who she is. The conflict of the story involves Elizabeth trying to find out who she is while growing up In a poor Maryland society during the Great Depression. Not yet a woman, but more than just a child, Elizabeth spends time with the neighborhood chill deer, causing innocent trouble and acting in childish ways. One hot summer day, the child Rene decide to taunt poor, elderly Miss Little and her precious marigolds.

However, the chi “deer at he time do not realize how much the flowers truly mean to Miss Little. That night, Al Sabbath overhears a conversation involving her parents and their financial and emotional pro bless. She lets her emotions which include sadness for never having her mother around; gar owing up in a poor town, being both a child and a woman, and seeing her father’s tears of sad sees get the best of her. She then sneaks out of the house and goes to Miss Lotteries house who ere she destroys the marigolds. When Elizabeth looks up from her destruction, she sees Miss Little standing there, with disappointment and sadness In her eyes.

In that moment the co inflict is resolved when Elizabeth finds out that she is no longer a child, but a woman with feel nags of compassion. The story is told from a first person point of view as told by Elizabeth. The story shows the thoughts and feelings of the main character. The conflicts of Marigolds are internal and external. The Internal conflict is Elizabeth versus herself emotionally with Innocence, compassion, growing up, and accepting response ability. The external conflict Involves Elizabeth and the poverty and rough times while grown Elizabethan character developed and changed in several ways.

In the beginning of the story, Elizabeth was a young girl that spent time with the young neighborhood children, ca sing trouble and having childish fun. She didn’t fully understand the difference between right and wrong. “For some perverse reason, we children hated those marigolds. They interfere De with the perfect ugliness of the place; they were too beautiful; they said too much about w hat we could not understand; they did not make sense. ” (Collier, page 79) The children taunt Miss Little, but do not mean any harm; they are Just innocently having a good time.

Whew n she angrily destroys Miss Lotteries marigolds, the only thing that the poor woman has, she I s no longer the innocent child that she used to be. In that moment, she changes from a y nouns carefree child to a woman that must take responsibility for her destructive actions. When Elizabeth saw the old lady look of sadness and pain, she finally realized what a horror able thing she had done, and felt compassion toward Miss Little. “Whatever verve there was elf t in her, whatever was of love and beauty and Joy that had not been squeezed out by life, had been there in the marigolds she had so tenderly cared for. (Collier, page 84) Throughout t e story, Elizabeth learns about herself and grows into a woman, feels compassion toward dos another person, and takes responsibility for her actions. Eugenia Collier used both did erect and indirect characterization to describe the characters. THEMES: Innocence: “Innocence involves an unseeing acceptance of things at face value, an gig moraine of the area below the surface. ” (Collier, page ) Elizabeth learns that when she destroy s the marigolds, she is no longer innocent. She was no longer an innocent child; she was g rowing up. In the simple act of destroying Miss Lotteries marigolds, she learns about maturing