Lincoln Second Inaugural Address Rhet Ana Essay

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Lincoln Second Inaugural Address Rhet Ana

Cassia Balkans period 5 In the speech given to the divided population of the United States (both North and South) at the time of taking his second term as President, Abraham Lincoln announced his vision for the future of his great country once again becoming whole. Lincoln makes mention of many Items that drive his view and position on the current happenings of the Civil War. These references calm his “Fellow-countrymen” so to speak, and allow for the future to begin when his speech ends. Lincoln experiments with very specific details to convey his wishes.

This almost unveils a hidden Imagery within, as one can visualize him speaking to the delved nation. He starts off his speech stating It Is his “second appearing to take the oath”, to remind everybody that he was elected as President once again. With this, he hopes people will be reminded why they put their trust In him for the last four years, and that they can do it again. He goes on to state “one-eighth of the whole population… ” As if he was telling the country a sick and twisted secret. However, it is no secret that the war happens to be about the issue of the very one-eighth he refers to.

Lincoln gathers his audience’s attention towards the middle of his speech (possibly to regain interest) by making reference to everyone’s Lord and Savior. Religion was still the most popular take on things. He doesn’t try to hide that there have been far more casualties than anticipated, but rather makes it sound okay by stating, “the Almighty has His own purposes,” and “yet if God wills that it [the Civil War] continue… ” He also incorporates a slight repetition when he says, “Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray… ” He praises God to imply he is not attempting to become Godlike figure by ending the war.

He does not want to sound like some robot when giving his speech; he truly yearns for the country to become whole. When he finally mentions the salves of the South, he states a rule of three, “To strengthen, perpetuate, and extend this interest [slaves]. ” However, none of this means that the fighting should go on. Lincoln ends his Inaugural Address by connecting with the families and loved ones of those lost in the war. His tone becomes somber braided with understanding and faithfulness… Not faithful as in religion, rather he Is faithful in his country. Lincoln announces his goal of ending the war.

He alms to “bind up the nation’s wounds” and “to care for him who shall have borne the battle. ” He understands that families have suffered great losses: lives they will never get back until It Is their time as well to walk the stairs to their final destination of peace. All In all, Lincoln uses many rhetorical strategies In his second Inaugural Address to convince the country a war Is not necessary. Somehow still slightly optimistic about the effect of his speech on both sides of the war, Lincoln finalizes his speech with the reasoning of the reuniting of the States once more, under Cod… To do all which may achieve and cherish a Just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations. ” Lincoln Second Inaugural Address Ret Ana By balance Period 5 Lincoln makes mention of many items that drive his view and position on the current unveils a hidden imagery within, as one can visualize him speaking to the divided nation. He starts off his speech stating it is his “second appearing to take the oath”, to people will be reminded why they put their trust in him for the last four years, and a Godlike fugue by ending the war.

He does not want to sound like some robot when fighting should go on. And faithfulness… Not faithful as in religion, rather he is faithful in his country. Lincoln announces his goal of ending the war. He aims to “bind up the nation’s families have suffered great losses: lives they will never get back until it is their time All in all, Lincoln uses many rhetorical strategies in his second Inaugural Address to convince the country a war is not necessary. Somehow still slightly optimistic about foreshadowing of the reuniting of the States once more, under God… “To do all which