How Do Walt Whitman in the Selections from Song of Myself Essay

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How Do Walt Whitman in the Selections from Song of Myself

Whitman had become a notable poet by the time the United States discussed against slavery by 1860; In the edition of 1 855 of Leaves of Grass Walt Whitman expressed his determination to elevate, exalt, purify and celebrate the natural attributes of body and the soul of man. His poetry resembles a conference or essays sometimes accompanied by oratory resources such as aphorisms, rhetoric questions, alliterations and parenthesis in order to provide his poetry with cohesion: ideas developed through analogies, narrative fragments, and contrasts. His form was the free verse.

He not only did not follow any of the conventions of versification and style he was closely related to a common speech-, and added unpretentious words and avoided excessive figurative language and phrases, such as: “the young men float on their backs, their white bellies bulge to the / sun, the do not ask who seizes fast to them”. He did not exclude anyone from his poetry; women and man alike. Whitman may be taken by modern and contemporary readers as a man with a message, bard- wise singing orator, as a man who experiments with poetry and prose and combines hem with words of common use.

He is a precursor of modern poetry and influence to feminist writers such as Adrienne Rich. Adrienne Rich addressee is women; she also seeks to establish equality between men and women in every social level: politics, culture, sexual life and equality in work; In “An Atlas of the Difficult World she breaks with a taboo In regard of sexuality: “before running up / the stairs / toward a new kind of love / your life has never allowed. ” She addresses to sexual equality amongst women and men as part of the individual rights but also refers to the roles of telling the truth and how silence can work to communicate.

Not only she seeks to break with taboos but also wants establish the figure of the Diane Middlebrow of that common world resides on how a new image of what is common enters culture from an ignored realm. Whitman does the same in Song of Myself and I quote: “This is the meal equally set, this the meat for natural hunger, / It is for the Wicked Just the same as the righteous, I make appointments / with all, / I will not have a single person slighted or left away, / The Kept woman, sponger thief, re hereby invited, / the heavy-lipped slave is invited, the venereal is invited; / there shall be no difference between them and the rest. Whitman invites women, slave and even the one with a venereal decease to Join him in the celebration of the universe with a feast; by means of language, Whitman digs up all these people and brings their into a realm of the public, he places them where they can be seen, and above all, heard. Rich replies: “A conversation begins / with a lie and each / speaker of the so- called common language feels the ice-floe split, the drift apart as if powerless… Poem can begin / with a lie… / Language cannot do everything / … What in fact I keep choosing / are these words, these whispers, conversations / from which time after time the truth breaks moist and green. “. She states that there is a lie, or rather a purpose -l quote Whitman: “Do you guess I have an intricate purpose? / Well I have. -, conversation, and language, eventually will be unable to stand by itself unless you choose what you have express provided you are part of the of the literary realm liberated from the dominance. Middlebrow refers to a “he” within the literary realm as universal conventions accepted by women; feminist writers reject the convention itself: she addresses that “women must write themselves; women must write about women and bring them to writing. Women seek a literary tradition for themselves.

Whitman makes no distinction though, for his intention is universal and therefore women emerge to the realm of the public: “the clean-haired Yankee girl works with her sewing-machine or in the factory or mill… ” He not only gave women recognition but also, through his universality, put them in the working realm, as part of a common world to every person. At the end of section 15: “and these tend inwards to me, and I tend outward to them, / and of these more or less I am, / and of these one and all I weave the song of myself. He borrows the verb weaving as a literary resource by means of taking the word off its original meaning but rather, by making his own meaning in function of the poem; he helps as well to create a common world in regard of universality in language by’ weaving his song” -although in Song of Myself Whitman contrasts this mage: he weaves as a craft whereas women already use machines. Anything can be expressed with the proper selection of words.

As part of a common literary realm, both poets establish a direct dialogue with the reader, testing their competence and context through questions, and answers; Whitman addressed: “Do you guess I have some intricate purpose? / Well I have… ” In we all are included within his song; we belong to a common world. Despite the fact of our nationality, creed, gender or language, Whitman is not exclusive, alike the Rich ho attempts to make her voice universal while asking: “How do I exist? A question to provide identity, equality and a common conscience to “myself” in relation to the “you”. This line was intended to be autonomous from the rest of the verse in the section six; its intention is to redefine social roles by means of a dialogue among equals, even though when the linguistic system could be different: “l know you are reading this poem which is not in your language / guessing at some words while others keep you reading and I want to know what words they are. “