August Wilson’s Fences – Stage Direction

Select three examples of a stage direction and comment on the effect. August Willow’s Fences describes the lives of Troy Manson, his family, and his friends. Readers recognize the importance of dialogue?the way characters speak to each other as well as the words they choose?Len learning their personalities. However, in plays, playwrights also characterize through stage direction.

In this scene, the stage commands drinking, offering, and handing help to set the tone of the peeing as well as of the characters of Fences. Firstly, upon returning to his wife and home, Troy and Bono drink as they talk. Rose proudly brings up that their son, Cord, “got recruited by a college football team” (Wilson; AH SSL; 8). Troy, however, reacts less pleasantly, saying “It Alan goanna get him nowhere”. Readers learn that Troy used to play baseball but never received the chance to play professionally, which he believes resulted from his skin color.

He states that if a person can play, then they “ought to have let you play” (10) which suggests his desire for equal treatment as well as the chance to play for a team. The stage direction, Troy takes a long drink from the bottle, follows this statement. This action allows readers to learn that, Troy already aged and married, still resents the injustice. Secondly, Troy’s eldest son, Lyons Joins later in the scene, greeted rather standoffish by his father, who claims Lyons only “was in the neighborhood cause it’s” (14) Troy’s payday.

Rose berates him because even though Lyons came to visit him, Troy wants to “start all that nonsense” (13). Troy responds easily that he “mint bothering Lyons” (14). This statement alone wouldn’t easily quell readers’ belief that Troy always acts so impassive towards his son. But, coupled with the stage direction, Offers him [Lyons] the bottle, readers feel that this gesture shows Troy’s affection for Lyons without words. Finally, during Troy and Boon’s conversation, Rose seems to speak in an nonaggression manner to her husband.

Even though she comments that Troy should “hush that talk” (11) when he begins one of his long stories, and says he sent need “to be drinking like that” (10), Troy easily rebukes her remarks, suggesting that he doesn’t listen to her opinion habitually. However, when Rose repeatedly tells Troy to “let the boy have ten dollars” (19) when Lyons asks to borrow some money, Troy laments but obeys, Handing Rose the money. This shows that, although Troy doesn’t always obey Rose, he listens to her and submits to her wishes at times.

Wilson personalizes his characters not simply through dialogue, but through the stage commands drinking, offering, and handing. Especially In plays, readers observe characters not Just based on their dialogue but also their actions. Wilson writes Troy as a hard man who easily tells outlandish stories but not his emotions. Through stage direction, Wilson creates affectionate dynamics between the Fences’ characters without their expressing It plainly. Unassuming August Willow’s Fences – Stage Direction By callisthenic each other as well as the words they choose?in learning their personalities. Team” (Wilson; AH SSL; 8).

Troy, however, reacts less pleasantly, saying “it anti goanna tastes that if a person can play, then they “ought to have let you play’ (10) which him, Troy wants to “start all that nonsense” (13). Troy responds easily that he “anti doesn’t need “to be drinking like that” (10), Troy easily rebukes her remarks, suggesting that he doesn’t listen to her opinion habitually. However, when Rose although Troy doesn’t always obey Rose, he listens to her and submits to her wishes stage commands drinking, offering, and handing. Especially in plays, readers observe without their expressing it plainly. Unassuming