Hell In The Pacific Essay

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Hell In The Pacific

In “Hell in the Pacific”, there Is a scene where the stranded American and Japanese soldiers stand face to face on the shore of the Island. The camera shows the profile of the two men’s face-off. After a close up of the squinted eyes of the American, he imagines the Japanese soldier charging at him and beating him to death with a long stick. After a similar close up of the Japanese soldier’s face, he Imagines the American charging him and stabbing him to death.

A chaotic, frenzied sound clip of saxophone USIA accompanies each vignette. The discordance of the soundtrack expresses each man’s uncertainty and anxiety over the looming, mysterious presence of the other soldier. The Jarring and startling auditory punctuation disorients the viewer, possibly making them more susceptible to accepting the imagined attacks as reality. Another Jarring, disturbing use of sound is a scene in which the American soldier taunts the Japanese soldier.

He bangs loudly on a metal pot and yells to the Japanese soldier. He uses the loud unpleasant sound as a sort of auditory attack on his mysterious enemy. Because the film does not feature plentiful dialogue, the audience Is barraged with ambient sounds (the typical sounds of Island nature) and sound effects. Screeching birds and loud waves Immerse the audience Into the uncultivated, wild environment of the Island. The calls of feral animals cement the idea of solitude on an island void of other inhabitants.

This could trigger a primal instinct within the viewer, driving the desire to see the men survive. Although the two soldiers begin as wary enemies, the evolution of their relationship from a sense of aggressive tenseness to that of partners in survival exemplifies the natural human fight-or-flight response. The gradual shift may be a remark on the world’s warring nature and possibly an indication of the movie’s creator’s idea that in order to survive, the inhabitants of the world should band together rather than wage war.

Hell In The Pacific By alpines In “Hell in the Pacific”, there is a scene where the stranded American and Japanese oldie’s stand face to face on the shore of the island. The camera shows the profile of stick. After a similar close up of the Japanese soldier’s face, he imagines the American audience is barraged with ambient sounds (the typical sounds of island nature) and sound effects. Screeching birds and loud waves immerse the audience into the uncultivated, wild environment of the island. The calls of feral animals cement the exemplifies the natural human fight-or-flight response. The gradual shift may be a